Wednesday, 16 November 2016

University Archives and Special Collections celebrates the Dymock Poets on 1 December

The University of Gloucestershire Special Collections and Archives is launching the Dymock Poets Online Catalogue. Several years in preparation, this database makes the Archives Dymock holdings accessible for the first time and is a tremendous research resource. To celebrate, the UoGSCA is hosting an evening of poetry and seasonal goodies. Students will read poems and there'll be a chance to hear about our longstanding ties with the Dymock Poets.

For more details, click here, or email Louise Hughes, Principal Library Advisor (Archives) at archives@glos.ac.uk


Thursday 1 December
6:00 - 7:30 pm
University Archives
Francis Close Hall (QU024)

Everyone is welcome

Friday, 28 October 2016

Come and see us at our Open Day on Saturday 29 October, Francis Close Hall



Francis Close Hall Campus, a Victorian marvel.

If you're thinking of studying English next year, come and visit us on Saturday. Students and staff will be there to talk about our course and to answer your questions. Take a student-led campus tour to get a feel for the place.  People from AccommodationFinance and Student Support will be on hand to help.

We think there's no better place to study English. Of course we would say that. But our graduates agree: English Literature and Creative Writing scored 100% on the National Student Survey this year.

Book your place now: Open Days 2016. See you on Saturday.

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Bob Dylan, Nobel Laureate: Yah-Boo!


John Hughes is Professor of Nineteenth-Century Literature at the University of Gloucestershire, and is the author of Invisible Now: Bob Dylan in the 1960s (Ashgate, 2013).


Bob Dylan’s elevation to Nobel Prize winner is something that has been in the wind for a while you can say, since every year his name is mooted as a candidate, a kind of standing reproach for some to the literary elitism of the Nobel committee. However, as so often with Dylan, the actuality of the prize has been divisive, testifying to his continuing power to stoke controversy over the value of what he does: specifically the literary quality, or even literary status, of his work. On the one hand, poets and writers throng to celebrate the award, and Seamus Perry, Chair of the Oxford English Faculty, makes an enthusiastic claim (with which I find it hard to disagree): that ‘Dylan winning the Nobel was always the thing you thought should happen in a reasonable world but still seemed unimaginable in this one’. On the other hand, the briefest glance at the internet or social media shows how actually how totally unimaginable it appears to so many people in fact that it should have been awarded in this world. Above all, the award has just irritated so many people who appear bamboozled by it, leading novelist Irving Welsh to claim in an oft-repeated tweet, that it was a ‘nostalgia award’ wrenched from ‘senile, gibbering hippies’. 



Yet it is worth pointing out Welsh remains in a tiny minority of literary artists, most of whom welcome the award (even if their own work remains more firmly entrenched in traditional print culture). An anthology of poems, for instance, by seventy poets greeted Dylan’s seventieth birthday, and Salman Rushdie, Andrew Motion, and many others (of the usual suspects) have been out and proud, and loud and vocal in the press since Dylan’s prize. So is this the Nobel just the occasion for a tiresome rehash of debates that have been going on since the sixties, about the literary qualities of Dylan’s work, where different people audition as gate-keepers or custodians of the literary, and squabble accordingly? Undoubtedly yes, it is all grist to the newspapers (in fact, the nadir of media coverage was plumbed by the BBC who showed a clip of a rubbish Dylan impersonator as the man himself on the 6 o’clock news).


However, even though it is a tired old debate, it is one that is worth considering briefly. My book on Dylan, Invisible Now, I confess was an attempt to find a way to write about what I saw as the sheer inspiration of his work when he was or is at his best, most undeniably in the mid-60s. But I was all too aware that it would be falsifying to treat it as poetry simply. Equally, it seems true that many poets remain in awe of Dylan’s mid-60s prodigality with words, and would give their eye-teeth to be able to do a fraction of what he seemed to do, and with such apparent abandon. So the need for me was to try for an idiom, a way of writing, that could register the literary qualities of his work, as well as its cultural influence, and subjective power, and all its other wider contexts and features… For instance: how write about the relation of his songs to the times, to his musical tradition, to the music, to his ways of singing, to the differing performances and so on? 

Bob & Sara Dylan with son Jesse, Byrdcliff home, Woodstock, NY, 1968

With reference to this discussion about the Nobel though, I believe it was this audacity and unbridled creativity with words that was always what other writers acknowledged. And this was often with a kind of amazement or envy that Dylan was able to take possession of popular forms and infuse them with a kind of endlessly transformative linguistic inventiveness that over and again in different ways was able to depict and contest his society, and to gauge variously its constraints and possibilities for individual expression. In this respect, those writers who have identified Dylan with ancient bardic traditions are surely on to something. More specifically too though, there is the point that it is not just what Dylan’s words mean that matters as what the words do. And this after all is in the other sense what the songs mean to those who love them. Right from my first listening to his songs, I felt there was an effect of vitality and decompression in his work that was bound up with the words, and that meant that what was important was the listener too; or put it another way, that the listener needed to be the kind of listener who could, and wanted to, respond to what Dylan, specifically, was doing with words.  And while many people do respond enthusiastically to this, one needs to acknowledge, many other people do not, or in mixed ways. And the bamboozlement or hostility that has greeted his award just speaks to this. In such ways Dylan was always a divisive figure, and continues to be so, as we have seen. So the question is not simply whether what Dylan does with words is poetry (the answer probably is no, but it is poetic or literary? Yes, and in the truest sense, one might say). Rather the question is whether one accepts what he does and responds to it, as I say. Which means that the essential thing is whether these songs speak to you, perhaps, whether one is able to answer the question ‘how does it feel?’ in some positive form or other.




Friday, 7 October 2016

Cheltenham Literature Festival 2016 starts today





The 2016 Cheltenham Festival of Literature begins today and runs until October 16. This year's programme is outstanding. The festival's theme is 'America Uncovered', and speakers include Sarah Churchwell, Reginald D. Hunter and P.J O'Rourke. History students already know that their Course Leader Dr Christian O'Connell is taking part in a session on New Orleans's music and culture on 12 October. Other highlights include appearances by novelists Ian McEwan, Eimear McBride, Lionel Shriver, Sarah Perry, Etgar Keret, and Val McDermid; travel writers Colin Thubron and Sara Wheeler; poets John Agard and Lemn Sisay; historian Mary Beard; director Oliver Stone; and many panel discussions on international literature, history, music and politics. Over 200 events are scheduled, plus a full programme for children. And that's just the official business. Cheltenham is a wonderful place to be during festival fortnight. We look forward to a week packed with books, coffee, music, and talk.

New events have been added this week. You can find out what's on day by day.

Are you planning to go to any events, or are you working as a Festival volunteer? Please send us a review. We'd love to publish your writing on the English Literature blog.

Facebook site (not affiliated with the University of Gloucestershire).

Image: CLF 2016 brochure.

Thursday, 22 September 2016

Social Media Intern

https://futureplan.glos.ac.uk/students/jobs/detail/279589/

Above is the link to an opportunity for students in our School, including one from English Literature. I do hope the link works okay; you should be able to find it on there anyway. Basically, every year we look for someone to help out with our online presence by twetting, tittering or blagging (oh, and taking photos) whenever an event comes up. This can be anything from Open Days to one-off lectures. You get some training, work experience and a tablet.

If you are more up to date with this sort of language than I am, then this might be for you.

Paul

Wednesday, 21 September 2016

How to land a book deal worth millions

You know how we’re always saying that nobody gets rich through writing fiction? Well, once in a while someone does. This year, that someone is publishing sensation Chloé J. Esposito. If this is the first time you’ve heard of her, rest assured it won’t be the last. Chloé has just sold the rights to her erotic thriller trilogy, Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know, in a deal that’s already worth over £2million. In addition to that, Universal have bought the film rights and there’s already speculation that Jennifer Lawrence or Emma Stone might play the protagonist. All this and the first book won’t even be released until next summer.

So how do you land a multi-million-pound book deal? Damned if I know. But Chloé does, and she’s coming to the University to share her whirlwind experience with University of Gloucestershire students. This is an extraordinary opportunity to hear first-hand one of the most sensational stories the publishing world has known in recent years, and it’s a rare chance to meet a global superstar writer before she’s insanely famous. Chloé will be talking at Francis Close Hall Campus, in TC001, at 6:30pm on Tuesday 4th October. The event is free and everyone is welcome.
You can read more about our guest here, and don’t forget to book the date!

Friday, 16 September 2016

Welcome back


Induction Week begins on Monday and we look forward to meeting our new students of English Literature. Then on the following week, we greet our current students who are about to enter levels 5 and 6 (level 6!).

We love September and all the excitement that the new academic year brings. Whether you are freshmen or returning students, a very warm welcome to you all, and best wishes for a book-filled year ahead.