Monday, 23 June 2014

Guest Editorial: Alex Edwards Reflects on Editing a Seventeenth-Century Playtext

During my third year at University I undertook a Degree Plus Internship, titled Editing a Renaissance Play. Throughout the course of the internship it was necessary to decipher and understand archaic meanings, spellings and punctuation, all of which required extensive attention to detail and long hours researching and reading. Despite the long hours and hard work I have found the internship to be wholly beneficial; it has allowed me to develop a number of skills, such as prioritisation, communication, problem solving and editorial and research skills. All of which will, undoubtedly, come in handy in the working world. These skills look great on your CV and also give you that added extra employability that every employer is looking for; I have also found it to be highly useful to have my work printed and bound in a booklet as an example of my capabilities for potential employers.
Aside from the skills developed throughout the internship it also has a great social aspect, an element that helped to relieve the workload considerably.

All of the interns were English Literature students, and so I think, it goes without saying that the internship and English Literature as a course work excellently hand in hand. However anyone with an interest in editing or 17th century literature would also benefit greatly.
I would urge any student who is considering undertaking an internship to just do it; don’t let the opportunity pass you by. The workload can seem daunting at times, but with the support of your Internship Leader and your colleagues it becomes both interesting and fun, with the added benefit of extra employability and developed skill-sets.​

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